Us Portugal Social Security Agreement

Since the late 1970s, the United States has established a network of bilateral social security agreements that coordinate the U.S. social security program with similar programs in other countries. This article provides a brief overview of the agreements and should be of particular interest to multinationals and people who work abroad during their careers. and, with regard to Portugal, the Minister or any other authority responsible for social security schemes in all or part of Portugal`s territory; Although the agreements with Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and Japan do not use the rule of residence as the main determinant of self-employment coverage, each of them contains a provision guaranteeing that workers are insured and taxed in a single country. For more information on these agreements, click here on our website or in writing to the Social Security Administration (SSA) under the Conclusion section, below. In cases where there is no totalization agreement between the two countries, additional costs may be incurred by the employer. This additional cost is as follows: the Social Security Provisions of the European Community (EC) do not replace the various national social security systems with a single European system. This would not be possible because of the large differences in living standards and social security systems between Member States. However, according to the European Commission, if you are entitled to social security benefits from both the United States and Portugal and you do not need the agreement to receive any of the benefits, the amount of your benefit in the United States may be reduced. This is the result of a provision of U.S. law that can influence how your benefit is determined if you also receive a work-based pension that was not covered by U.S. Social Security. For more information, visit the Windfall Elimination Commission (publication 05-10045).

If you are outside the United States, you can write to us in the „More Information“ section. Applications should include the name and address of the employer in the United States and the other country, the full name, place and date of birth of the worker, nationality, U.S. and foreign Social Security numbers, location and date of employment, and the start and end date of the assignment abroad. (If the employee works for a foreign subsidiary of the U.S. company, the application should also indicate whether U.S. Social Security Insurance has been agreed upon for employees of the related company pursuant to Section 3121 (l) of the internal income code.) Self-employed workers should indicate their country of residence and the nature of their self-employment. When applying for certificates under the agreements with France and Japan, the employer (or non-employee) must also indicate whether the worker and accompanying family members are covered by health insurance. Eu rules apply to all EU Member States, i.e. where bilateral agreements exist, they are not mentioned here. The Social Security Agreement between the United States and Mexico was signed on June 29, 2004. The agreement must be submitted to the U.S. Congress and the Mexican Senate for consideration, so the agreement is not currently in effect (December 2014).

These objective rules include what may not apply to any agreement reached by the United States: salaried workers, employers and the self-employed may be required, before the agreement, to pay social security contributions in the United States and Portugal for the same work. Canada has international social security agreements with more than 50 countries with comparable pension plans.